Toyota FT-4X Concept Vehicle

What is the Toyota FT-4X?

The Toyota FT-4X Concept – or, “Future Toyota”-Four-Wheel Drive Crossover is the latest SUV concept vehicle from Toyota. Utility at its best. From designated “warm” and “cool” storage boxes to door handles that serve as impromptu water bottles, the FT-4X pairs function with fun

Tip the work-life balance scale in your favor. Introducing the revolutionary Toyota FT-4X Concept, designed by Toyota’s CALTY Design Research to answer the growing urge to escape. This 4-door 4WD crossover displays generous approach and departure angles that add to the Toyota FT-4X’s prowess on a variety of roads—paved or not. Wide over-fenders and beefy tires add to the simplistic rugged exterior, while inside, it’s a toolbox for all your things. Fold the rear seats flat and secure cargo with topside tracks, slide out the rear cargo floor to reveal more storage, and access the Multi-Hatch rear door that splits to swing open or functions as a one-piece lift-gate—whatever your getaway, it’s ready to take you there.

Keep reading for all of the details!

The FT-4X is a rolling gear box. Not only is the interior’s concept that of a large open space having plenty of easily accessible storage for basic equipment, but it is basic equipment itself. Passengers can easily identify the space’s purpose based on coloring, as blue classifies closed storage, while orange indicates open storage.

On the inside of the Multi-Hatch with rear Picture Window are twin boxes – one warm, the other cold. They’re designated for a number of functions, such as the temporary stowage of snacks, or the warming and cooling of gear (i.e. gloves, blankets, ice packs, etc.).

The cabin is sectioned into threes: Clean Zone, where the front passengers sit, and where rugged floor mats and door sills were inspired by Japanese sunoko slatted wood flooring; Wet Zone, also characterized by all-weather mats (where passengers can stow damp swimsuits/snow clothing or muddy boots) and located just behind the front seats, as well as below the rear second row bench seat; and, Rear Cargo Zone. The Rear Cargo Zone’s floor lays completely flat and features topside tracks for securing cargo. A deep storage compartment is hidden underneath, and can be accessed by sliding the floor out toward the Multi-Hatch, transforming the floor into a tray. Folding the second row bench seat down extends the floor’s capacity considerably. Red tie down hooks line the sides of the rear’s cargo hold, too, for added load securing. Above, in the headliner, resides removable inside lighting that doubles as a flashlight.

Diving deeper into the cabin reveals more nifty elements. The rear door handles serve as impromptu water bottles. Its armrests have USB outlets and big, rotatable window switches. And, much like the rear’s ceiling-mounted removable flashlight, the dome light can serve as an exterior locator or beacon.

An ultra-compact The North Face® sleeping bag fits neatly between front passenger seats, and functions as an armrest that is strapped atop an extra-large dividing console. The console can fold upward, revealing additional storage capacity for medium-sized gear. Its breathable, high-grip, hybrid mesh surface allows for wet items to dry quickly, and its bungee cord lattices keep small items in place. Front passenger doors receive identical large window switches and removable water bottle door grips as the rear, but gain blue storage boxes camouflaged as armrests.

The dash ahead of the front passenger is a mix of blue and orange designated storage. A larger blue chest “floats” above a carved orange bin. On both sides of the chest are slim air vents capable of rotating down in order to warm, dry, or cool clothing such as gloves and hats. A removable multimedia audio system is part boom box, part in-dash stereo and is engineered with an extra-large handle grip (ala exterior door handles).

Although there is no traditional navigation screen, designers did include a mobile phone mount directly above the driver’s digitized cylindrical instrument cluster. The concept being that a downloadable navigation application, as well as an application showing digitized off-road instrumentation, can be made available for drivers’ use. Gen Y-ers, Calty’s designers realized, rely heavily on their mobile devices for GPS directions.

Read the full press release from Toyota here.

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